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Showing posts from November, 2016

Health Supplier Segment: OzHelp Foundation by HealthProfessionalRadio

In today's Health Supplier Segment, we are joined by Tony Holland CEO of OzHelp Foundation here to share his insights on the report released by Orygen titled “Raising the Bar for Youth Suicide Prevention.” OzHelp is the leading not-for-profit in Australia with a focus on suicide prevention and is moving to provide support through web-based programs working in concert with local services to identify people at risk and support them with information, advice and referrals.
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NPR News: Trump's Choice To Oversee Medicaid Signals Likely Changes For Health Program

Trump's Choice To Oversee Medicaid Signals Likely Changes For Health Program
Big changes could be in store for Medicaid — the government program that provides health care for more than 70 million Americans. President-elect Donald Trump has chosen the architect of Indiana's Medicaid overhaul to head the program nationwide.

Read more on NPR

OCD Triggers

Taking Wellbutrin for smoking cessation. Afraid it set off an ocd issue. Not sure. Can Wellbutrin cause a issue like this?A: You didn’t give me much to go on. You should really talk to the prescriber about whether you are experiencing a side effect.I do have one guess: Sometimes when a person gets serious about quitting smoking, the result is tremendous anxiety. You want to quit. But quitting makes you anxious. The anxiety makes you want to do go back to smoking for relief. That can feel like OCD.If that’s what you think is happening, I strongly encourage you to add some talk therapy to your treatment for smoking cessation. Quitting smoking is hard! It is likely you need some more support while you do it.I wish you well.
Dr. Marie

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Spiritual Experiences Can Activate Brain Pleasure Centers

Profound new research suggests religious and spiritual experiences activate brain reward circuits in much the same way as love, sex, gambling, drugs and music.Investigators at the University of Utah School of Medicine believe science is just beginning to understand how the brain participates in experiences that believers interpret as spiritual, divine or transcendent.“In the last few years, brain imaging technologies have matured in ways that are letting us approach questions that have been around for millennia,” said senior author and neuroradiologist Jeff Anderson, M.D., Ph.D.The findings appear in the journal Social Neuroscience.In the study, the investigators set out to determine which brain networks are involved in representing spiritual feelings in one group — devout Mormons. They did this by creating an environment that triggered participants to “feel the Spirit.”Identifying this feeling of peace and closeness with God in oneself and others is a critically important part of Mor…

Marriage to Soul Mate May Reduce Altruism

New research suggests wives who have a romantic view of marriage are less likely to do volunteer work, leading their husbands to volunteer less as well.But husbands’ romantic view of marriage was associated with neither their own nor their wives’ volunteering, according to a Baylor University study.Young-Il Kim, Ph.D., research assistant professor in Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion, and co-researcher Jeffrey Dew, Ph.D., professor in the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University, set out to test the claim of a classic study — “Greedy Institutions” — done more than 40 years ago.In the paper, sociologist Lewis A. Coser argued that marriage is a greedy institution demanding exclusive commitment from married couples. This makes it harder for married couples to spread out their time and energy to other people and institutions, Coser said.Kim and Dew decided to review the study in a current context. Interestingly, they found some similar results although they were surprise…

Kids’ Appropriate Use of Words Improve Spatial Skills

As our world becomes more technical, preparing students for success often means improving their spatial skills. Paradoxically, new research suggests the training should begin with the way children use words.Hilary Miller, a University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student studying child development, explains that it’s not how many words a kid knows, it’s how they choose them.That is, how the words describe the child’s grasp of the layout of their physical word tells the most about their spatial skills. For example, using words to show that they understand where they are relative to a friend, explaining how to rotate puzzle pieces to fit them together, or conjuring a mental map of the park, can improve spatial skills.“We know that better spatial abilities lead to better math skills in early childhood, and they are strong predictors of future interest in careers in science and technology and engineering,” says Miller. “So we’re targeting ways to enhance spatial skills at an early age.”W…

The Dilemna of Having Large Student Loans & Waiting to Start a Family

I am 26 years old. I am starting to worry about my financial future, as I have graduated with $85,000 in student loans. I am worried about retirement savings and I am worried about my short term future. I am worried that it would be irresponsible for me to get married and have children when I am in debt. The majority of my loans are private, so repayment plans are at a minimum. I have calculated that even with accelerated payments, that I can only be debt free within 10 years with my current salary. That’s 10 more years of living at home, no room for savings, and delaying the family that I know I want. I want to know if it is smart to think of these rewards when I have the burden of debt hanging over me? I know that my priority is to eliminate the debt as fast as possible, but I can only do so much and I am scared that 10 years is too long of a time to wait for a family.A. You’re not alone in your concern about student loan debt. It is a top concern among American college students. Th…

Students with Disabilities More Likely to Be Bullied

Children and teens with disabilities are much more likely to be bullied in school, compared to their peers without disabilities, and this victimization tends to persist into high school, according to a new study led by a researcher at the University of Missouri (MU).The findings suggest that youth with disabilities are not developing adequate social skills to help protect themselves from bullying as they get older.“This study points out the necessity for special education programs to teach appropriate response skills to children with disabilities,” said Dr. Chad Rose, an assistant professor of special education in the MU College of Education.“Schools need to further develop these programs by tailoring social development goals for each individual student to ensure they are learning the social skills that will help them prevent bullying from occurring.”“Prior research has shown that children with disabilities, when bullied, may react aggressively when they lack appropriate response skil…

First Impressions Are Important — They Last

The adage that “first impressions are the most lasting,” appears correct as new research finds that people tend to be influenced by another person’s initial appearance.Cornell University researchers say that although people are often advised to “not judge a book by its cover,” people often to do just that.Dr. Vivian Zayas, a professor of psychology at Cornell and her colleagues found that people continue to be influenced by another person’s appearance even after interacting with them face-to-face.First impressions formed simply from looking at a photograph predicted how people felt and thought about the person after a live interaction that took place one month to six months later.“Facial appearance colors how we feel about someone, and even how we think about who they are,” said Zayas, an expert in the cognitive and affective processes that regulate close relationships.“These facial cues are very powerful in shaping interactions, even in the presence of other information.”The research…

Trouble with Father of My Child

From the U.S.: I am a single mother of a three year old having some trouble with my ex-fiance and the father of my child.I left my ex-fiance two years ago after I came home from work to find my child starving and my ex passed out because he was drunk. My daughter hasn’t been fed all day long, and how I could tell is because all of the breast milk left for her was still in bottles in the same spots I left them in the refrigerator. My ex lied to me, saying he fed her an apple which we did not have in the house.Needles to say he was gone the next day out of our house. I told him to get his life together and seek help for his alcoholism if he wanted his family back. Instead he got an apartment, a girlfriend, and drank even more, flaked out on his days to watch her (which were only a few hours at a time since I didn’t trust him), not to mention steal money from and claim he accidentally took it out of our conjoined bank account.Fast forward two years he keeps trying to act like he is a fat…

New Study Fails to Replicate ‘Power Pose’ Effect

The idea behind power poses is that if you stand in a “powerful” position, broad posture, hands on hips, shoulders high and pushed back, you will suddenly feel psychologically and physiologically stronger.Although the concept is intuitively appealing, a new study finds the premise is incorrect.University of Pennsylvania researchers Coren Apicella, an assistant professor in the psychology department, and Kristopher Smith, a fourth-year psychology Ph.D. student, attempted to replicate an earlier study on power poses.The earlier study appeared in 2010 in the journal Psychological Science, and reported the poses resulted in increases in feelings of power, risk taking and testosterone and a decrease in cortisol. In the new study, the Penn researchers found no support for any of the original effects, often called embodied cognition.The new findings appear in the journal Hormones and Behavior.“We did find that if anything — and we’re skeptical of these results, because we’d want to replicate…

Anxiety, Depression Tied to Teens’ Physical Problems

European researchers have identified patterns in youth linking mental problems to physical disorders such as arthritis and skin diseases.Psychologists at the University of Basel and Ruhr University Bochum determined that arthritis and diseases of the digestive system are more common in youth who have suffered from depression. Moreover, when youth experience anxiety issues, they tend to be followed by skin diseases.Physical diseases and mental disorders affect a person’s quality of life and present a huge challenge for the healthcare system. If physical and mental disorders systematically co-occur from an early age, there is a risk that the sick child or adolescent will suffer from untoward developments.Dr. Marion Tegethoff, in collaboration with Professor Gunther Meinlschmidt from the University of Basel’s Faculty of Psychology, led a team of researchers to examine the temporal pattern and relationship between physical diseases and mental disorders in children and young people.The res…

I Feel Frustrated, Depressed, Anxious, & Angry 7 Days a Week

It’s hard to sleep when I am anxious. & I feel anxious because I have been unemployed for roughly 8 years searching for a medication that will help with my anxiety and a sleep aid. But no pill can change the fact that I can never make up for loss time. I’m 30 y/o but I feel like a kid in an adult body & no matter what I do or how fast I do it, I can never seem to catch up with the rest getting left behind.A. It’s common for depressed people to believe that everyone else is doing better than they are. They don’t see or feel the suffering of the masses. You are in tune with your suffering because you feel it intimately every day, but many other people are suffering, too. The erroneous idea that most others are not suffering can cause depressed people to feel even more depressed. They tend to believe that they are alone in their suffering. Generally speaking, that is not the case. You don’t see it and you may not hear about it, but life is exceptionally challenging for the vast m…

Sleep Loss Affects Kids’ Brains Differently Than Adults

Most any parent can attest to the consequences of their child not getting enough sleep. Now, new research discovers sleep deprivation affects kids’ brains much differently than adults’.“The process of sleep may be involved in brain ‘wiring’ in childhood and thus affect brain maturation,” said Salome Kurth, Ph.D., first author of the study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Kurth is a researcher at the University Hospital of Zurich.“This research shows an increase in sleep need in posterior brain regions in children.”This contrasts with what researchers know about the effects of sleep deprivation in adults, where the effect is typically concentrated in the frontal regions of the brain.After staying up too late, both children and adults need a period of deep sleep to recover.This recovery phase is characterized by an increase in an electrical pattern called slow-wave activity, which can be measured with a non-invasive technique called an electroencephalogram. With a large num…

Women & Men May Understand Visual Cues Differently

A new study finds that women and men really do see some things differently: They look at faces and absorb visual information in different ways, which suggests a gender difference in understanding visual cues.The findings stem from study performed by psychologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Investigators used an eye-tracking device on almost 500 participants over a five-week period to monitor and judge how much eye contact they felt comfortable with while looking at a face on a computer screen.They found that women looked more at the left-hand side of faces and had a strong left eye bias, but that they also explored the face much more than men.The team observed that it was possible to tell the gender of the participant based on the scanning pattern of how they looked at the face with nearly 80 percent accuracy. Given the very large sample size, the researchers suggested this is not due to chance.Lead author Dr. Antoine Coutrot from QMUL’s School of Biological and Chem…

Melinda Adkins on Learning Homesteading Skills

Melinda’s Urban Homesteader journey began as a child watching her mother and grandmother tend their gardens which instilled in her a love and appreciation for gardening.  After college she purchased a home in the city and secured employment with the local school district as well as a part-time Park Ranger.  The park had an 1880's working farm on the property which gave her the opportunity to visit and observe vintage skills. It was during her time as a Park Ranger that her love for the outdoors and living a simpler life really grew. She has a great love of nature, has earned a Wildlife Habitat Certification as a result.  Eventually, she began incorporating skills she learned from the farm staff into her own urban homestead. Somehow she finds time to watch documentaries in her spare time to continue her learning. Melinda is highly invested in helping her community and is the founder of HPC-Community.com IN THIS PODCAST: Greg talks to community homesteader Melinda who founded a comm…

Teen Scores a Win for Transgender Athletes

Three years ago, transgender Canadian teen Jesse Thompson filed a human rights complaint against his teen hockey league. Thompson identifies as male, but his league would not allow him to use the boys’ locker room. This outed him as transgender to his teammates and led to him being bullied. Now, thanks to Thompson’s efforts, amateur hockey leagues in Ontario, Canada, have ruled that transgender players are entitled to privacy and to the use of facilities “corresponding to their gender identity.”

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Struggling with Crippling Loneliness

From the U.S.: I’m 17, and throughout my years on this earth I’ve never really had anyone stay around for long, and if they did I’d eventually regret that they did. My parents weren’t really much of parents, my brother had abused me for years, and I rarely see any of my other relatives. I’ve only been able to say the words I love you once in my life and mean them. I haven’t hugged anyone in years, I can’t remember when I last did anyways. In short, I feel unlovable, I feel as if this world doesn’t want me and subsequently has decided to leave me behind.I recently broke up with said person I said that I loved, and she loved me too. But I ended up messing that up and ran away because I was afraid she’d just didn’t care about me. I’ve only realized recently how wrong I was, and how much I must’ve hurt the only person I’ve ever cared about. And needless to say I’ve been struck lonely. Again.I’ve been seeing a counselor, which my parents are paying for. They’re not bad people in anyway way…

Those with Schizophrenia Share Tips on Living Productive Lives

In a new study, researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and colleagues at the University of Southern California describe some of the strategies people with schizophrenia have used to overcome the disorder and function successfully in their careers.Their findings appear in the journal Psychiatric Services.Investigators conducted up to three interviews each with 10 men and 10 women with schizophrenia from the Los Angeles area. All of them continued to have some psychotic symptoms even as they were employed in professional, technical or managerial occupations.“To the best of our knowledge, no previous studies have addressed how individuals with schizophrenia who also met some definition of recovery manage the symptoms of their disease,” said Dr. Amy Cohen, an associate research psychologist and the study’s first author.The researchers found that the people they interviewed had adopted numerous coping strategies to prevent and deal with symptoms. These strategies includ…

Fathers’ Embrace of Role Tied To Less Behavioral Problems in Pre-Teens

A new U.K. study suggests a new father’s adjustment to being a parent and his confidence in this role, rather than the amount of direct childcare they give, seems to be important during a child’s early years.Investigators discovered pre-teens whose dads embrace parenthood may be less prone to behavioral issues.The nature of parenting in a child’s early years is thought to influence their short- and long-term well-being and mental health, which are in turn linked to development and educational attainment.But it’s not entirely clear what impact the father’s role might have, as much of the research to date has tended to characterize paternal involvement in a child’s upbringing as one-dimensional.The researchers therefore drew on data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) study, which has been tracking the health of nearly 15,000 children since birth, to assess several aspects of paternal involvement. The study is published in the online journal BMJ Open.The pa…

I Think I Have a Mania or Obsessive Disorder. Should I See a Therapist?

I have created a fantasy world in my head with characters and one of them talks to me in my head. Often when I’m alone I will reply to them out loud. When I was younger it was good because I was never alone. But now it is causing me to see and hear things or people that aren’t there. My parents believe I have ADHD and it’s simply an overactive imagination but I’m not so sure. It has caused me to have nightmares and get this weird feeling like someone is following me. On one hand I see the world in a way that I would never be able to, but on the other hand it’s starting to drive me crazy. What makes it worse is I used to be able to do this thing where I could tell what people were thinking, but now I can’t do it. Instead when I look at people I get this horrible feeling that they’re thinking the worst of me. I have thought about taking my life but I always talk myself out of it because I wouldn’t want to hurt my family’s feelings or make them believe I didn’t
care about them or they di…

Lost Brain Connections May Be Behind Aging’s Memory Loss

Researchers believe a lack of cohesion among brain regions is a key reason for age-related memory decline.During youth, the brain is characterized by brain regions consisting of large synchronous groups that link nearly the entire brain in coordinated activity.In a new study, investigators discovered these groups of brain regions that synchronize their activity during memory tasks, become smaller and more numerous as people age. Interestingly, the number of connections is different for each individual although the reduction in synchronized activity is consistent.The study has been published in PLOS Computational Biology.Typically, research on brain activity relies on average brain measurements across entire groups of people. In the new study, Dr. Elizabeth Davison of Princeton University, New Jersey, and colleagues describe a novel method to characterize and compare the brain dynamics of individual people.The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to record heal…

US Kids’ Diet Improves, But Still A Long Way to Go

New research finds that while the diet of U.S. children has improved markedly, quite a bit of work still needs to be done as on the whole, diet quality remains poor.Investigators tracked diet between 1999 and 2012 for more than 38,000 kids and found that disparities remain among key subgroups.The bottom-line measure in the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition is the standard, 100-point Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2010) score. During the study period the average HEI-2010 rose to 50.9 from 42.5 as children ate more healthy foods, such as whole fruit, and became increasingly likely to avoid “empty calories,” such as sugary drinks.The latter improvement explained about one-third of the total improvement.“I am encouraged by the gains,” said study lead author Xiao Gu, a master’s student in epidemiology in the Brown University School of Public Health. He collaborated with corresponding author Katherine Tucker, Ph.D., of the University of Massachusetts Lowell on the st…

Obsessed with My Therapist

From the U.S.: Forgive me, this is going to be a very fragmented story…About 5 months ago my female therapist of a year and a half transferred me to a male therapist because I was a little obsessed with her. Nothing sexual. But I did look her up online and managed to find out…. probably everything about her.I know it’s not ok. Upon seeing her children and husband I was really angry at her. I still don’t REALLY know why. Jealousy likely I guess. I told her about it and she decided that maybe she “couldn’t help me” like someone else could. That means she just didn’t want to deal with me anymore right?It was frustrating because I’ve known her since I was around 9 years old. But, even knowing my hatred for sex and men in general, she transferred me to a male therapist and said that he would help me not feel like that towards them anymore. About a month into therapy I began researching him as well… I didn’t know what to do with my thoughts. They were very sexual. I’ve never had sexual thou…

Stuttering Tied to Brain Changes in Speech, Attention Regions

A new study links stuttering to changes in brain circuits that control speech production, as well as circuits that support attention and emotion.For the study, researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in adults and children who stutter.Consistent with past functional MRI studies, the findings demonstrate neuro-metabolite alterations across the brain, according to the researchers.Developmental stuttering is a neuropsychiatric condition. Its origins in the brain are only partly known.To measure an index of neural density related to stuttering in circuits and brain regions suspected to be affected, the scientists performed proton shift imaging of the brain in 47 children and 47 adults. The study included subjects with and without stuttering.The research team found that affected brain regions included major nodes of the so-called Bohland speech-production network (associated with the regulation of moto…

DNA Impacts Mating With Those of Similar Academic Success

People who are genetically predisposed for high academic achievement tend to marry and have children with partners with similar DNA, according to a new study published in the journal Intelligence.Most romantic partners are not chosen randomly, but rather through “assortative mating,” meaning that people with similar phenotypes tend to pair up with one another more often than would be expected under a random mating pattern. This might involve pairing up with mates who have similar traits regarding age, skin color, weight, intelligence or education.While it is well known that humans mate assortatively in relation to education — in that people with similar education levels tend to pair up — this is one of the first studies to show that this phenomenon is highly influenced by DNA.The researchers say that DNA-led assortative mating could potentially increase genetic and social inequality in future generations, since children of couples who mate assortatively are more unequal genetically th…

What’s Wrong with My Mother-in-Law (and Wife)?

1. She arbitrarily ‘chooses’ people, distrusts them and thinks of them as liars, amoral, inferior, etc. People arbitrarily chosen are the ones close to me.
2. Thinks her family, her morals and beliefs are ‘superior’ to mine but bends her ‘superior morals’ whenever needed to suit her convenience.
3. My wife has a similar personality. She will make a fuss out of something, call her mother and trigger her off (Eg; During my wedding reception, my parents got carried away greeting guests. My wife blamed my parents for ‘not offering her water on purpose’ – she did not even ask for it. She triggered her mother. Her mother asked me to ‘offer water to a thirsty woman even if I am not willing to feed my wife’. Both women soon got enraged.)
4. Shows dual behavior – first she is this soft ‘parent-of-an-abused-girl-god-believer’, transforms into a raging verbally abusive woman derogating me and my family, cursing death/dismemberment/etc. to my parents. Later, she absolutely denies all she said in …

Creative Activities Can Boost Well-Being

Everyday creative activity may lead to an “upward spiral” of increased well-being and creativity in young adults, according to new research.For the study, researchers from the Department of Psychology at New Zealand’s University of Otago asked 658 university students to keep a daily diary of their experiences and emotional states over 13 days.After analyzing the diaries, the researchers, led by Dr. Tamlin Conner, found a pattern of the participants feeling more enthusiasm and higher “flourishing” than usual following days when they were more creative.Flourishing is a psychological concept that can be described as increasing positive growth in oneself, the researchers explained.While the study did not specifically ask the students to record the nature of their creative activity, the researchers had collected such information informally in an earlier study.The most common examples were songwriting; creative writing (poetry, short fiction); knitting and crochet; making new recipes; paint…