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Showing posts from June, 2016

July 2016 Horoscope

Cancer pets will be bright, cheery and ready to celebrate – tail wagging and purring will be a normal occurrence.

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July 2016 Planetary Overview

A month of love and compassion, and to shine like the brightest star.

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Does Your Pet Need an Animal Communicator?

Animal whisperer Ellen Lance of Ask My Pet gives advice on how to build a better bridge of communication between you and your pet.

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Taylor Swift, Tom Hiddleston and Calvin Harris

Taylor Swift, Tom Hiddleston and Calvin Harris

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ADHD, Depression, Communication Problems & Stress

Hello! Since i was a kid i always had problems of making friends. I travelled a lot, went to summer camps in Europe, prestige ones, graduated a good university(bachelor degree). But i always had the same problem: at some point i was becoming a person no one paid interest to or even tried to ignore me. Sometimes it even turn to fights… When i turned 18 i have found a couple of very good friends and we were drinking every weekend. didnt pay attention to health issues and many times (about 10) drank till blacking out… couldnt control myself and felt completely happy while being drunk. I also was smoking marihuana for about half a year. Ive never had a girlfriend(not because i am an unattractive, but my behavior) . The second problem i face–i cant concentrate at all. Since i was very young i have lost like 10 cell phones, credit cards, wallets, driver license, laptops. And i really hate myself for this. I tried many different sports(triathlon, half-marathon, boxing) for building precision…

Revenge Really Is Bittersweet

Academic research on the human compulsion to seek revenge suggests revenge is a complex emotion that is extremely difficult to explain.Despite popular consensus that “revenge is sweet,” years of experimental research have suggested otherwise, finding that revenge is seldom as satisfying as anticipated and often leaves the avenger less happy in the long run.Emerging research from Washington University in St. Louis expands our understanding of revenge, showing that our love-hate relationship with this dark desire is indeed a mixed bag, making us feel both good and bad, for reasons we might not expect.“We show that people express both positive and negative feelings about revenge, such that revenge isn’t bitter, nor sweet, but both,” said the study’s first author, Fade Eadeh, a doctoral student in psychological and brain sciences.“We love revenge because we punish the offending party and dislike it because it reminds us of their original act.”The new study uses a provocative “use case” to…

Exercise Can Boost Youth Academic Performance

Using the best available evidence on the impact of physical activity on children and young people, researchers find that time taken away from lessons for physical activity is time well spent and does not come at the cost of getting good grades.The statement on physical activity in schools and during leisure time appears online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. It was drawn up by a panel of international experts with a wide range of specialties from the UK, Scandinavia, North America and Denmark.The document includes 21 separate statements on the four themes of fitness and health; intellectual performance; engagement, motivation and well-being; and social inclusion. The recommendations encompass structured and unstructured forms of physical activity for 6- to 18-year-olds in school and during leisure time.Recommendations include:• physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are good for children’s and young people’s brain development and function as well as their intellect…

Kids’ Binge Eating Tied to Unavailable Parents, Weight Teasing

Children whose parents are emotionally or physically unavailable or whose families engage in weight-related teasing are more likely to develop binge eating habits, according to a new study at the University of Illinois (U of I). Parental weight, race and income had no effect, however.“This study found that childhood binge eating is really associated with parents’ weight-related beliefs, but not their actual weight, and their emotional availability but not necessarily the income availability,” said Jaclyn Saltzman, a doctoral researcher in human development and family studies, and a scholar in the Illinois Transdisciplinary Obesity Prevention Program.Saltzman explains that childhood binge eating can lead to depression, obesity and many weight and eating behavior problems as the child grows into adulthood. The key is early recognition and intervention.“Intervening early to address binge eating may not only help prevent an eating disorder from emerging but also prevent lifetime habits of…

Going to Church Tied to Lower Suicide Risk In Women

A new study reveals that women who attended religious services had a lower risk of suicide compared with women who never attended services.Suicide is among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States. In the research, Tyler J. VanderWeele, PhD., of the Harvard School of Public Health, and coauthors looked at associations between religious service attendance and suicide from 1996 through June 2010.The researchers analyzed data from the Nurses’ Health Study with their findings reported online in JAMA Psychiatry. The analysis included 89,708 women and self-reported attendance at religious services.Among the women, who were mostly Catholic or Protestant, 17,028 attended more than once per week, 36,488 attended once per week, 14,548 attended less than once per week and 21,644 never attended based on self-reports at the study’s 1996 baseline.Authors identified 36 suicides during follow-up.Compared with women who never attended services, women who attended once per week or more had a…

I Think I’m in Love with Two Men

From the U.S.: Where to begin. About 5 years ago when I was very young (16) I met my first love, to whom I lost my virginity to and fell deeply in love with. However, his parents at the time were getting separated and he took this out on me. He didn’t treat me right and I broke things off after about 2 years – not because I didn’t still love him but because we had too many issues at the time.Since that time we have still kept in contact and he has worked through his issues and become much more mature and still loves and wants to be with me. None of my current friends still know I talk to him, as when we broke up all I did was complain about him and they disliked him.The last six months, though, I have started dating someone else who I also fell in love with. He is good friends with my current friends. When Im with him I am very happy, but sometimes I still think of my first love and wonder if Ill always think of him. I honestly feel like I am in love with both of these men.The second …

Working Hard Often Paired With Playing Hard

New research from Canada supports a correlation between a motivation to seek accomplishment and an attraction to leisure.Queen’s University biology professor Dr. Lonnie Aarssen investigated the maxim “work hard, play hard,” a saying that has been traced back to at least 1827.“I’ve been interested for quite a while in two motivations that people seem to display — one I call legacy drive and one I call leisure drive,” said Aarssen.Yet, despite its status as a standard in Western society, a statistical link between the two motives has never been quantified.Aarssen, along with undergraduate student Laura Crimi, conducted a survey of over 1,400 undergraduate students at Queen’s. Participants were asked to identify their age, gender, religious affiliation and cultural background. They were then asked a series of questions to determine their attraction to religion, parenthood, accomplishment or fame, and recreation.While some degree of correlation was seen between most of the factors listed,…

Michael Judd on Edible Landscape Design

Michael Judd has worked with agro-ecological and whole system designs throughout the Americas for the last 20 years focusing on applying permaculture and ecological design to increase local food security and community health in both tropical and temperate growing regions. The founder of both Ecologia, LLC, Edible & Ecological Landscape Design and Project Bona Fide, an international non-profit supporting agro-ecology research.Come listen and learn about Michael's adventure in rural latin america and what he learned from some Mayan tribes.  He tells us how he learned they managed to meet all of their needs without help from the outside.  Here is a bit of what we can learn in this podcast:
What the word Regenerative meansHow design can take natural healthy ecosystems and design for human needs as well as life around us.Agro-ecology and what that meansWhat is “alley-cropping”Stacking functions and “how you can get the most bang for your buck” and what it might look like.Herb Spiral…

Fear of Possession Due to Horror Movies

Hi I’m a 14 year old girl who’s been suffering from anxiety for as long as I can remember, and I’d like to bring up a new fear that has been bothering me nonstop recently, On Friday I had some friends over for the weekend to hang out, and they suggested we watch a scary movie. I was a little reluctant about the idea, but I did it anyway. Well I really REALLY wish I hadn’t. Ever since then I’ve been afraid (I know it sounds ridiculous) I’ve been afraid of being possessed and hearing voices. There was no fear around this topic until they mentioned watching the movie, so I’m most likely sure that’s how it started, although this is a fear I’ve had in the past, I don’t recall it being this bad. This fear turned into not only the fear of being possessed, but the fear of hearing voices and becoming schizophrenic. It seems like no matter what family tells me I can never seem to believe that everything I’m afraid of are just thoughts. I want to learn how to not doubt that all of my anxiety is …

Programs to Curb Prescription Drug Abuse Underutilized

A new study reports that programs to prevent prescription abuse are in place, but underutilized. The finding comes at a time when prescription drug abuse is a raging epidemic across America.Celebrity deaths like that of Prince and Heath Ledger have heightened the sensitivity of Americans on the problem. Moreover, the realization that the addiction is a true public health problem — with addictions across the population from teens to seniors — has led legislators to call for programs to combat the abuse.The new study is informative in showing that programs already exist for the addiction, yet they are underutilized. The report comes out of Maine, one of the U.S. states hardest hit by the “epidemic” of prescription painkiller and heroin abuse. Researchers say that although there have been some positive trends recently, there are also troubling ones.The study appears in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.Investigators report that in 2014, a high percentage of women in their 80s —…

Rat Study: Anti-Anxiety Meds May Lower Empathy

Anti-anxiety medications may lower levels of empathy, according to a new rat study by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago.Research has shown that rats are often emotionally motivated to help other rats in distress and routinely free their trapped friends. However, the new findings show that rats who were given midazolam, an anti-anxiety medication, were less likely to free their trapped companions.Midazolam did not affect the rats’ physical ability to open the restrainer door. In fact, rats on this medication routinely opened the door for a piece of chocolate but did not feel motivated enough to open the door for their stressed companions. The findings suggest that motivation to help others relies on emotional reactions, which are dampened by the anti-anxiety medication.“The rats help each other because they care,” said Peggy Mason, Ph.D., professor of neurobiology at the University of Chicago. “They need to share the affect of the trapped rat in order to help, and that’s a f…

Helicopter Parenting Can Hinder College-Age Kids

A new study finds that parents who are too involved with their college-age kids could indirectly lead to issues such as depression and anxiety.“Helicopter parents are parents who are overly involved,” said Florida State University doctoral candidate Kayla Reed. “They mean everything with good intentions, but it often goes beyond supportive to intervening in the decisions of emerging adults.”Reed and Assistant Professor of Family and Child Sciences Dr. Mallory Lucier-Greer explain that what has been called “helicopter parenting” can have a meaningful impact on how young adults see themselves and whether they can meet challenges or handle adverse situations.Though much attention has been paid to the notion of helicopter parenting, most of the studies have focused on adolescents.The current study, found online in the Journal of Child and Family Studies, specifically examined emerging adults, or college-aged students navigating the waters of attending college.Researchers surveyed more tha…

Is My Depression a Life Time Curse?

I didn’t realize I was suffering from depression until many years into it. I finally went to a psychologist and psychiatrist when my life was falling apart. I felt awful and had felt awful for a very long time, but after getting on medications and feeling like a normal, happy person for a couple years, it all felt like an old unreal dream. So I decided to stop my medications. My doctors advised me against it, saying that if I had suffered more than 3 episodes, I should stay on medication indefinitely, but I had never “counted” my episodes. Really, it just felt like I was born with one long and nasty episode. I have been off my meds for a month now and I feel horrible. My anxiety is so bad that my whole body hurts from being so tense and shaky. I’m missing work either because I’m too busy crying or I just don’t want to deal with life. I feel lonely, sad, and hopeless. I feel like I am cursed for life. From what I have read and heard, depression occurs in episodes. But I feel like I am …

Early Screening Can ID First Responders with Mental Health Risks

A new UK study has discovered emergency service workers at risk for mental health issues can be identified by screening during their first week of training.Individuals at risk can then receive preventative interventions to increase mental resilience to stress and trauma.In the study, researchers from the University of Oxford and King’s College London studied trainee paramedics to see if they could identify risk factors that made people more likely to suffer post-traumatic stress (PTSD) or major depression (MD).Dr. Jennifer Wild from the University of Oxford explained, “Emergency workers are regularly exposed to stressful and traumatic situations and some of them will experience periods of mental illness. Some of the factors that make that more likely can be changed through resilience training, reducing the risk of PTSD and depression.“We wanted to test whether we could identify such risk factors, making it possible to spot people at higher risk early in their training and to develop i…

Green Environs May Reduce Teen Aggression

Emerging research finds that living in an urban community blessed with greenery such as parks, golf courses or fields, appears to reduce teen aggression.Experts explain that studies have shown that the families we grow up in, the places we work, and the friends we keep (our social environment) play a large role in influencing behavior.Nevertheless, the influence of the physical environment on behavior, has not received extensive inquiry.To address this void, researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) recently conducted the first longitudinal study to see whether greenery surrounding the home could reduce aggressive behaviors in a group of Southern California adolescents living in urban communities.The study will appear in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).The team, part of the Department of Preventive Medicine and the Department of Psychology, followed 1,287 adolescents, age 9 to 18 years. They assess…

ASPD or a Form of Autism?

From a teen in the U.S.: I have been told I have one of the two, aspd (Anti-social personality disorder) or autism. I always assumed it was aspd.Anyways on a day to day basis I feel only a handful of emotions. Which to me that seems completely normal and fine. I grew up in a normal home but I feel no guilt. And growing up with that as a child allowed me to get into a bit of trouble.I do have a bit of an ego and feel above the people around me. I have no connection to those around me, I can be socially outgoing or anything really. I consider myself a master at personality mirroring, I get into people’s heads. I find that chaos intrigues me. I can lie flawlessly, my parents noticed that and my lack of guilt as a child but let it be. When I am alone i have no emotion because there is no one for me to mirror, I am myself and all I’ll feel is a sense of content but to me that’s fine, I feel my best when I am at that state. Feeling and thinking this way seems superior in my opinion.I have n…

Child Abuse or Witnessing Parental Violence Tied to Later Substance Abuse

Children who are the victims of sexual and/or physical abuse or who witness chronic parental violence are far more at risk of becoming substance abusers as adults, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto.“We found that both direct (physical and sexual abuse) and indirect (witnessing parental domestic violence) forms of childhood victimization are associated with substance abuse,” said lead author, Professor Esme Fuller-Thomson, Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair at the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Institute for Life Course & Aging.The findings show that one in five drug-dependent adults and one in six alcohol-dependent adults experienced childhood sexual abuse, compared to one in 19 in the general Canadian population. One in seven adults with drug or alcohol dependence had been exposed to chronic parental domestic violence, compared to one in 25 in the general population.According to the study, parental violence was cons…

Student Stress May Be Linked to Teacher Burnout

A new, first-of-its-kind study examines the connection between teacher burnout and students’ stress levels.Researchers from the University of British Columbia collected saliva samples from over 400 elementary school children, grades four to seven, at 17 public schools.Cortisol levels were then assessed from the samples as the hormone is commonly used as a biological indicator of stress. Correspondingly, teacher burnout was determined through survey results.Investigators found that in classrooms in which teachers experienced more burnout, or feelings of emotional exhaustion, students’ cortisol levels were elevated.Indeed, the relationship between student stress and teacher burnout is a chicken and egg question.The study appears in the journal Social Science & Medicine.Higher cortisol levels in elementary school children have been linked to learning difficulties as well as mental health problems.“This suggests that stress contagion might be taking place in the classroom among studen…

Brain Tumors May Present as Depressive Symptoms

In a recently published case study, doctors describe how a woman with treatment-resistant depression was eventually diagnosed with a brain tumor.“Depressive symptoms may be the only expression of brain tumors,” Dr. Sophie Dautricourt of Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Caen, France, and colleagues write in BMJ Case Reports. “Thus, it is challenging to suspect a brain tumor when patients with depression have a normal neurological examination.”They illustrate this phenomena by outlining the case of a 54-year-old woman who had been depressed for six months. She was experiencing apathy, difficulties making decisions, sleep disorders, suicidal thoughts and problems with concentration and attention.There was no personal or family history of mental illness, but she had recently gone through several stressful events. The antidepressant fluoxetine and the anti-anxiety medication bromazepam had no effect and were discontinued after five months.Once the patient was given a brain CT scan and MRI …

Many LGBT People Face Mental & Physical Challenges

A survey of approximately 68,000 adults suggests lesbian, gay and bisexual adults experience substantially higher rates of severe psychological distress, heavy drinking and smoking, and impaired physical health than heterosexuals.Researchers used information obtained by the National Health Interview Survey, believed to be the most representative health sample conducted to date. The results were reported in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine by researchers at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and University of Minnesota School of Public Health.The findings, which support earlier findings of smaller, less representative surveys of the LGB and transgender community, “should serve as a call to health care professionals and public health practitioners to pay particular attention to … this small, diverse and vulnerable population,” the authors concluded.“This study adds to the previous research on LGBT health disparities and has important implications for policy and practice,” said G…

I Don’t Like People

From Dubai: Hello, I don’t like people a whole lot. I’m not scared of them, it’s just that I do not like nor value any form of human interaction, if it’s not with either my best friend, class mates or on stage.That’s correct, I am not scared of groups of people, just don’t like them or care about them. You may have noticed too that my parents were not mentioned in the above list, and that’s because I do not like talking to them about any thing that might even slightly provoke them, and make them want to help me; I don’t like people trying to help me. I want them to tell me their problem with me, and I try to fix it if I find it genuine.I don’t go out, not at all, not even with my best friend or class mates. I prefer text based conversations more, as I feel that is the only way even he can fully understand the extent of what what I’m trying to say.I do not have Facebook or Instagram; my parents forbade me from using the two or in fact any other medium through which interaction may be p…

Study May Dispel Mental Origins of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Emerging research discovers chronic fatigue syndrome has physical rather than mental roots.Until now, physicians have been unable to pinpoint the origin for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or link the condition to consistent abnormalities in body chemistry.CFS is a condition where normal exertion leads to debilitating fatigue that isn’t alleviated by rest. There are no known triggers, and diagnosis requires lengthy tests administered by an expert.Now, for the first time, Cornell University researchers report they have identified biological markers of the disease in gut bacteria and inflammatory microbial agents in the blood.As described in the journal Microbiome, researchers describe how they correctly diagnosed myalgic encephalomyeletis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) in 83 percent of patients. Investigators used stool samples and blood work to determine CFS, offering a noninvasive diagnosis and a step toward understanding the cause of the disease.“Our work demonstrates that the gut…

Texting on Smartphones Can Alter Brain Waves

Mayo Clinic researchers have determined that sending text messages on a smartphone can change the rhythm of brain waves.Although a high percentage of the population use smart phones, the neurological effects of smartphone use is relatively unknown.To find out more about how our brains work during textual communication using smartphones, a team led by Mayo Clinic researcher William Tatum analyzed data from 129 patients.Their brain waves were monitored over a period of 16 months through electroencephalograms (EEGs) combined with video footage.Dr. Tatum, professor of neurology and director of the epilepsy monitoring unit and epilepsy center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida found a unique ‘texting rhythm’ in approximately 1 in 5 patients who were using their smartphone to text message while having their brain waves monitored.In the study, investigators asked patients to perform activities such as message texting, finger tapping and audio cellular telephone use in addition to tests …

Jodi Torpey on Blue Ribbon Vegetables

Jodi Torpey is an award-winning vegetable gardener, craftsy gardening instructor, and the founder and editor-in-chief of WesternGardeners.com. In addition to the two books she authored, her garden writing also appears in digital and print media. Since 2010 she’s organized the annual Plant a Row for the Hungry campaign in Denver, Colorado.

Jodi has a lot of great advice on how and why to start growing vegetables for competition purposes.  Listen in to our "biggest" podcast ever and find out why we say that.  You will also learn about ...Participating in a National Plant a Row campaign and how she brought it to her community.Why we should try to win prizes for our homegrown fruits and vegetables.How to interject new life into your garden.Preparing for bringing entries to your local county fair.Advice for first time competitors in the fruit and vegetable categories.

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Health Supplier Segment: Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia by HealthProfessionalRadio

David Meldrum is the Executive Director of the Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia, a federation of long-standing member organisations delivering specialist services for individuals and families. MIFA members operate out of nearly 150 locations across Australia. They work with and alongside participants and members of our organisations in every program, whether as staff, managers, peers, volunteers or board members. MIFA works closely with families, carers and friends as well as the person with a mental illness. Their holistic objectives involve assisting individuals and families in their journey to recover mental health, physical health, social connectedness and equal opportunity in all aspects of life. Their collaborations with other service providers ensure that their front doors will always lead to the best local services.
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Losing Myself & Getting Scared

For the last year or so I have been getting progressively worse and its getting to a point that worries me.I’ve been dealing with extreme paranoia and trust issues for as long as I can remember and have had some trauma in my life but no abuse.Lately I’ve been having much more extreme mood swings and loss of time. I lose hours at a time and have no recollection whatsoever of what I did or how I did it. Conversations, trips to the store, I can seemingly lose it all. After asking those around me I have discovered that during these blank spaces my speech becomes almost incomprehensible and my demeanor is much different than normal.I hear and see things that nobody else can especially when I’m alone, things like children crying out to me and shadows darting around in the corners of my eye. It’s getting worse and happening more often to the point where its starting to keep me from sleeping some nights.I have dreams now which I never had a couple months ago, in these dreams horrible horrible…

Racial Discrimination Tied to Death Ideation in African American Children

Experiences of racial discrimination may be linked to death ideation (thoughts of death or dying) in African American children, particularly in girls, according to a new study by a researcher at the University of Houston (UH).The study, titled “A Longitudinal Study of Racial Discrimination and Risk for Death Ideation in African-American Youth” was led by UH psychology professor Rheeda Walker. Her findings are published in the journal Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.“When a child experiences discrimination, he or she may say to themselves, ‘I’m not worthy’ or ‘I’m not good enough,'” said Walker. “Effective interventions can offset these feelings and help a child’s self esteem.”For the study, Walker analyzed data previously gathered from interviews with 722 African-American children recruited from schools in Georgia and Iowa. These boys and girls were interviewed at age 10 and again at age 12. In her analysis, Walker noted that more than one-third of the adolescents reported d…